Image: Ray Collins Photography

Australian photographer Beam Collins utilizes his camera to highlight the fleeting magnificence of sea waves as they surge and break in falls of ocean froth. Collins swims out to the ocean every day, wanting to catch the fleeting moments when sun-dappled water peaks into conspicuous shapes like mountains and slopes. Solidified in time, each suspended wave tackles appears like a glass figure shot through with colors of aqua and emerald.

Taking a look at his exquisite pictures, it’s difficult to believe that Collins, who is visually challenged, just began seeking after photography in 2007 after being a coal digger for quite a long time. Not able to work in the mines any more on account of a knee damage, he supplanted his underground world with a submerged heaven loaded with daylight, surfing, and staggering swells of water. “I’ve been working in an underground coal mine longer than I have been making images, but my earliest memories are of being in the ocean, so I guess it’s a full circle of influence,” he told the Huffington Post. “I’ll tell you what, though, nothing feels better than being in the sea after breaking rocks and avoiding being crushed by collapsing tunnels for 12 hours straight. Complete freedom.”

Collins’ photographs can be found in Found at Sea, his most up to date end table book depicted as “a visual journey capturing the fleeting moments of a wave’s journey to dissipation.”

 

Image: Ray Collins Photography
Image: Ray Collins Photography
Image: Ray Collins Photography
Image: Ray Collins Photography
Image: Ray Collins Photography
Image: Ray Collins Photography
Image: Ray Collins Photography
Image: Ray Collins Photography
Image: Ray Collins Photography
Image: Ray Collins Photography

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